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ROBOTICS

Hey, Alexa, tell Roomba to vacuum the bedroom.

ROBOTICS

When Digit spends an afternoon unloading boxes from a tractor-trailer in 100-plus-degree heat, co-workers never hear a complaint. Digit, a blue-and-white humanoid robot, was designed to handle the tough, menial and dangerous tasks at warehouses.

ROBOTICS

Few cultural disputes inflame British passions more than the disposition of the Parthenon Marbles. Public debate about the statuary has raged since the early 1800s, when the sculptures and bas-reliefs, which date from 447 B.C. to 432 B.C., were stripped from the Parthenon and other Classical Greek temples on the Acropolis of Athens by agents of Thomas Bruce, a Scottish statesman and seventh earl of Elgin. The marbles were purchased — some say looted — by Elgin during his time as ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, the occupying power; they have resided in the British Museum since 1817.

ROBOTICS

The elephant has a secret hiding right on its nose.

SCIENCE

NASA’s Space Launch System moon rocket began its slow crawl toward the launchpad, ahead of schedule. The target date for its uncrewed maiden flight is Aug. 29.

SCIENCE

Humans spend about 35 minutes every day chewing. That adds up to more than a full week out of every year. But that’s nothing compared to the time spent masticating by our cousins: Chimps chew for 4.5 hours a day, and orangutans clock 6.6 hours.

SCIENCE

Five million years ago, immense predatory sharks patrolled the oceans. Their giant teeth — left behind in coastal sediments like spent bullets — inspired the 1843 name that has since become a household word: megalodon.

SCIENCE

About 66 million years ago, Earth was smacked in the face by an asteroid.

TECHNOLOGY

WASHINGTON — Early last year, Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, and Jake Sullivan, President Biden’s national security adviser, met to discuss China and industrial policy. During their conversation, Mr. Rubio raised his worries about Beijing’s influence over TikTok, the Chinese-owned viral video app.

TECHNOLOGY

To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

TECHNOLOGY

In 2019, the White House declared that phone and internet equipment from Chinese technology companies should be ripped from every corner of the U.S. because it posed an unacceptable risk of snooping or sabotage by the Chinese government.

TECHNOLOGY

In 2020, an artificial intelligence lab called DeepMind unveiled technology that could predict the shape of proteins — the microscopic mechanisms that drive the behavior of the human body and all other living things.

ENGINEERING

IT TURNS OUT that the Garden of Eden might have been missing a few things. Today, the fruit aisle is stocked with all kinds of new temptations, and they seem to be getting sweeter. Let’s start with the grapes, namely Cotton Candy grapes (green), Gum Drop grapes (purple) and Gummyberries (red). Imagine my disappointment when, in June, I tried some grape jam-flavored Jellyberries from the company Divine Flavor and found they tasted like regular old grapes — sweet, but not Smucker’s sweet.

ENGINEERING

In 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope, the beleaguered project to build an instrument that could gaze back to the earliest stars in the universe, appeared to be going off the rails. Again.

ENGINEERING

A new generation of scientists is growing up with CRISPR technology. Here’s how some high school students learn to edit genes.

ENGINEERING

Smartphones, superglue, electric cars, video chat. When does the wonder of a new technology wear off? When you get so used to its presence that you don’t think of it anymore? When something newer and better comes along? When you forget how things were before?

ART

Sheida Soleimani speaks the language of birds, deftly contorting her lips and breath to recite lilting sounds with distinct avian fluency. As far as the Iranian American artist is concerned, it’s her second language after Farsi. “Before I could speak English, I used to listen to bird sounds on tape,” says Soleimani, 32. She would spend hours playing recordings in her childhood bedroom, specifically bird sounds from North America. “I didn’t really have friends at the time,” she adds.

ART

FORT BELVOIR, Va. — The Army Reserve officers worked with brisk efficiency.

ART

For years, Georges Lotfi made himself a valuable source of information to prosecutors investigating the global trafficking of looted antiquities.

ART

PHILADELPHIA — Dazzled by the iconic Cézanne, Matisse and Seurat paintings, most visitors to the Barnes Foundation overlook the African sculptures. Yet to Albert C. Barnes, who founded the collection, they were central. He started acquiring African sculpture in 1922, the year he set up the foundation, because it had inspired Picasso, Modigliani and many other artists in France he supported. “When the Foundation opens, Negro art will have a place among the great art manifestations of all times,” he wrote to his Parisian dealer in 1923.

MATH

This lesson is a part of our Accessible Activities feature, which aims to welcome a wider variety of learners to our site and to The Times in general. Learn more and tell us what you think here.

MATH

Featured Article: “Americans Say High Prices Are Hitting the Things They Need to Get By” by Emily Badger, Aatish Bhatia and Quoctrung Bui

MATH

Imagine a world where we can turn cancer-causing tobacco into a renewable energy source; where needles are virtually painless; where we can repurpose our own cells to reverse degenerative diseases; and where we can use lasers to discover buried ancient worlds.

MATH

This essay, by Anya Zhang, 17, from Dublin Jerome High School in Dublin, Ohio, is one of the top eight winners of The Learning Network’s third annual STEM Writing Contest, for which we received 3,564 entries.