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ROBOTICS

Arshia Khan asked a group of older adults in Minnesota what they would like in a nursing home, and their answer surprised her. They wanted standup comedy, but not just any comedy: They wanted off-color jokes.

ROBOTICS

A young man sporting elf ears and a pink beard danced shirtless to trance music. A crowd of people sipped Liquid Death, a new water brand marketed at festivals, as they shimmied and swayed, striking up conversations with strangers. Bystanders sat on grassy hills for a bird’s-eye view, taking in the colorful scene with intrigue. In a corner, a woman tested out a “sensory experience” chair, wearing a virtual-reality headset as her high-tech chair vibrated vigorously. Candy-scented clouds traveled from vape to mouth to air.

ROBOTICS

On the evening of Oct. 10, 2006, Dennis DeGray’s mind was nearly severed from his body. After a day of fishing, he returned to his home in Pacific Grove, Calif., and realized he had not yet taken out the trash or recycling. It was raining fairly hard, so he decided to sprint from his doorstep to the garbage cans outside with a bag in each hand. As he was running, he slipped on a patch of black mold beneath some oak trees, landed hard on his chin, and snapped his neck between his second and third vertebrae.

ROBOTICS

This article is part of a limited series on how artificial intelligence has the potential to solve everyday problems.

SCIENCE

Sheldon Krimsky, a leading scholar of environmental ethics who explored issues at the nexus of science, ethics and biotechnology, and who warned of the perils of private companies underwriting and influencing academic research, died on April 23 in Cambridge, Mass. He was 80.

SCIENCE

Most octopus species live for one year. But the deaths of octopus mothers after they reproduce have long been a scientific spectacle.

SCIENCE

A virus that shows no signs of disappearing, variants that are adept at dodging the body’s defenses, and waves of infections two, maybe three times a year — this may be the future of Covid-19, some scientists now fear.

SCIENCE

The story of modern electronics is often equated with the relentless advancement of the silicon-based microchips that process information in our computers, phones and, increasingly, everything else. Moore’s law has become a well-known summary of how those chips become ever more compact and powerful.

TECHNOLOGY

SAN FRANCISCO — The price of Bitcoin plunged to its lowest point since 2020. Coinbase, the large cryptocurrency exchange, tanked in value. A cryptocurrency that promoted itself as a stable means of exchange collapsed. And more than $300 billion was wiped out by a crash in cryptocurrency prices since Monday.

TECHNOLOGY

Uber on Wednesday reported strong growth in its ride-hailing and delivery businesses and said it was continuing to bounce back from a pandemic slump, even as it lost $5.6 billion because of its investments in other ride-sharing companies, primarily the Chinese service Didi.

TECHNOLOGY

Over the past 15 years, clever digital ideas have captured imaginations, transformed habits and reshaped industries and economies.

TECHNOLOGY

As Twitter negotiated a sale to Elon Musk last month, the social media company pulled out a corporate takeover playbook.

ENGINEERING

In a tech industry dominated by Apple, Alphabet, Meta and Microsoft, it can be easy to forget that much of the humdrum work that makes screens flicker, servers hum and businesses run is performed by companies that rarely make the headlines, companies that have been gradually shaping the computer business for decades, companies like IBM.

ENGINEERING

The leaked draft opinion suggesting the Supreme Court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade cited claims frequently made by opponents of abortion. The opinion, written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., at times presents those assertions as indisputable facts while omitting context and counterarguments.

ENGINEERING

Traces of a virus known to infect pigs were found in a 57-year-old Maryland man who survived for two months with a heart transplanted from a genetically altered pig, according to the surgeon who performed the procedure, the first of its kind.

ENGINEERING

Electric vehicles, lots of them, are coming whether we’re ready or not. The looming Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards and the need for manufacturers to standardize production have made a switch to electric inevitable. But while the E.V. fleet is accelerating rapidly into our future, there are bumps in the road, including, most notably, a lack of ready buyers.

ART

Sometime late in the summer of 1962, Andy Warhol began to silk-screen the face of Marilyn Monroe onto canvas, on backgrounds painted green, blue, red, orange, black — sometimes even gold. Those repeating Marilyns, which sold for all of $225, were some of the most radically novel and influential works of the 20th century; they filled much of Warhol’s first New York show of Pop Art.

ART

In 1985, the dealer Tony Shafrazi designed a poster promoting his show of paintings made jointly by Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat. The image featured the two artists in boxing gloves as if preparing to spar with one another.

ART

Yashua Klos’s first solo museum exhibition, “Our Labour,” at the Wellin Museum of Art in Clinton, N.Y., is a profoundly meaningful debut. Throughout the show the themes of family and labor are intertwined with the historical circumstance of the Great Migration and the coincidence of a DNA test revealing his blood relatives who had been barely known by the artist.

ART

The cave meanders for two miles under northern Alabama, with passages that veer into mysterious so-called dark zones, sediment deposits, a waterfall and deep pools. Ancient footprints are embedded in its remotest passage. The names of Union soldiers from the Civil War remain scrawled on a wall.

MATH

Featured Article: “Americans Say High Prices Are Hitting the Things They Need to Get By” by Emily Badger, Aatish Bhatia and Quoctrung Bui

MATH

Imagine a world where we can turn cancer-causing tobacco into a renewable energy source; where needles are virtually painless; where we can repurpose our own cells to reverse degenerative diseases; and where we can use lasers to discover buried ancient worlds.

MATH

This essay, by Anya Zhang, 17, from Dublin Jerome High School in Dublin, Ohio, is one of the top eight winners of The Learning Network’s third annual STEM Writing Contest, for which we received 3,564 entries.

MATH

This essay, by Pyncha Soottreenart, 17, from Bangkok International Preparatory and Secondary School in Bangkok, is one of the top eight winners of The Learning Network’s third annual STEM Writing Contest, for which we received 3,564 entries.